See What’s Happening Out There

A letter in the Arcadian Jan 24, 2019, page A-4 in response to a previous interview with Mosaic on mining in Desoto County

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

See what’s happening out there

Mr. Garrett, I think you need to step out of your office and check out the protests and commissioners’ meetings in other counties, because the citizens certainly don’t welcome Mosaic with open arms (Arcadian Jan. 17). Hundreds have attended or marched in opposition. The type of fertilizer application Mosaic promotes has proven detrimental to our waterways, and considering the effects on our local fisheries, is not feeding the world. The world is fed by small farms. Sustainable farming is much less harmful to the environment.

Mosaic’s VP described a Ft. Meade that is prosperous. Yet within the city center, building vacancy rate is 27.4 percent, higher than 92.9 percent of U.S. neighborhoods. Some 18.8 percent live in poverty. This doesn’t sound prosperous to me.

Mosaic has proven itself to be a poor neighbor to those who live nearby, or were forced to move due to the loss of their quality of life. The first-hand stories I have heard are heart-breaking. Mr. Schweiss brags about Mosaic’s environmental safety record, contradicted by witness accounts, and most seriously displayed by their long delay in reporting the massive gypstack sinkhole, which he tries to divert attention from. Sinkholes in regions that are mined are not a coincidence, as Mosaic’s massive use of water is not mentioned either, nor are the outflows pumping diluted pollutants into our precious creeks. Rick Scott’s DEP has removed and lowered protections, and I am proud of our own commissioners for protecting our beautiful DeSoto County. Informed people don’t greet bullies with open arms. Behind Mosaic’s glad-handing stands a big bully.

Sarah Hollenhorst

Arcadia

Phosphate Mining Battle in Bradford & Union Counties

Battle over phosphate mining roils small Fla. town

Clip: 10/31/2018 | 7m 53s    PBS NewsHour Presentation

Phosphate mining is a major industry in Florida, but it’s also a major source of pollution, responsible for red tide, toxic algal blooms and killing wildlife. In the northern part of the state, residents of a small town are resisting a man who wants to mine phosphate near their homes. Can the local government balance individual rights and with community health concerns? Laura Newberry reports.

Aired: 10/31/18

PBS NewsHour Video 10-31-18

Hardee County BOCC Public Meeting – Attendance is Vital – July 9 and 10, 2018

To all 3PR members and associates.
The hearing to decide the huge Ona mine will be held July 9 and 10 from 3pm to whenever it ends, on both days, Monday and Tuesday.  Decisions will be made on these important items:
1. How much financial compensation (Economic Mitigation) the county will be able to get for the future economic losses due to degraded farmland and development potential.
2. A Major Special Exception, or rezoning of 28,000 acres from agriculture to strip mining.
3. Whether to approve the 28,000 acre mining of natural and agricultural lands.
We need your showing and arguments, whatever they may be. We know that very few benefit from phosphate strip mining and many are harmed in one way or another, including future generations deprived of their historical and natural heritage. The hearing is at:
Hardee County Board of County Commissioners Chambers
Room 102
Courthouse Annex
412 West Orange Street
Wauchula, FL
You can contact Brooks or Dennis
863-558-1588 or 863-494-4687
In DeSoto County, a float is being prepared to participate in the 4th of July parade in Arcadia starting at 9 AM, downtown. Call  or text Sarah if you want to be in the parade with 3PR and Friends of Horse Creek. 863-244-1663.

Letters to the Arcadian Newspaper – June 14, 2018

Letters to the Arcadian June 14, 2018

More letters to the Arcadian June 14, 2018

Side note to Debbie Taylor re your comment about how important phosphate is to get clothes clean.  Phosphates were banned from use back in the early 1970s due to extreme environmental damage from water runoff into our water system.  And yet, our clothes still get clean.