Desoto County Attorney’s Remarks

For those who were unable to attend the Board Of County Commissioner’s meeting in Arcadia on 12-11-2018, here is a recording of the County Attorney, Donald D. Conn, as he presents his comments regarding the selection of Special Magistrate and the nuances of the mediation process between Mosaic and the County:

Also, this link will take you to the Florida Statutes, Chapter 70, that Attorney Conn refers to in his remarks.  The Statute is about Private Property Rights Protection and plays a significant role in what is taking place in Desoto County:   

https://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2011/70.001

DeSoto Rejects New Mosaic Mine

DeSoto County rejects new Mosaic phosphate mine, surprising even mining foes

Tampa Bay Times News Roundup – Craig Pittman

Updated: July 26, 2018 at 12:41 PM

The world’s largest phosphate company, Mosaic Co., lost its bid Wednesday night to open a new mine on 18,000 acres of land near one of the state’s most pristine creeks.

After hearing impassioned testimony from hundreds of people over the course of two days, the DeSoto County Commission voted 4-1 Wednesday to reject Mosaic’s request to change the zoning on its property from agricultural to mining.

FULL ARTICLE IN TAMPA BAY TIMES AT THIS LINK:

http://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/Mosaic-spent-20-years-planning-new-phosphate-mine-DeSoto-County-has-rejected-it_170349203

Variance Renewal Request

Link to the Mosaic letter to the FDEP re a Variance Renewal Request for the Fort Green Mine Reclamation timing for an additional 10 years.

FDEP_FG_2018_Variance Renewal Request_Final_3-29-18

Florida Statute 378.209 is referenced in the Renewal Request

http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=0300-0399/0378/Sections/0378.209.html

Company ordered to pay Idaho tribes for toxic waste storage

credit photo: idahostatejournal.com

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — An agribusiness company that turned phosphate into fertilizer must pay $1.5 million in permit fees annually to eastern Idaho tribes to store millions of tons of toxic waste on tribal lands, a federal court has ruled.

Continue reading “Company ordered to pay Idaho tribes for toxic waste storage”

Letters to the Editor – Bradenton Times

Letters to the Editor
Bradenton Times
Saturday, Feb 11, 2017

Would mining activities preclude future normal uses of mined out lands? This is question #6 from the Manatee County staff report, Standards for Master Mining Approval, page 13.

The answer is much more than staff reports. Not only building, but agriculture on reclaimed land would be extremely limited. Is the burden of proof not on the applicant? The market has not demonstrated that agriculture is a viable use of reclaimed mine land.

Mosaic may have their small, intensely managed experiments with ag after mining, however, vast areas of western Polk County demonstrate no agriculture to speak of on reclaimed land. The only exception is a rare siting of a few cows on grazing land.

Go to Hardee County. In 2008, a “Mosaic Agreement” granted the county economic gurus 42 million dollars over a ten year period as compensation for the 11,000 acre South Fort Meade Extension mine. The county will tell you is for economic mitigation in the post-mining economy. This money hopes to start up industry, but the results have been questionable at best. Is this not an admission even by the industry itself that after mining and reclamation, lands will not support the former economy of agriculture.

One time, temporary use; permanent loss. Phosphate strip mining is only profitable for Mosaic. Commissioners, think ahead one hundred years. Vote for Manatee County. Vote no on phosphate mining.

Brooks Armstrong
Bone Valley resident

3 PR joins Center for Biological Diversity and Manasota 88 and Suncoast Waterkeepers in litigation

Environmentalists will sue if Corps permits Florida phosphate mining

Mosaic phosphate

Four environmental groups have put the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on notice that they’ll sue if the Corps follows through with authorizing phosphate mining on more than 50,000 acres of land in Central Florida. The environmentalists say the strip mining damages wildlife habitat and endangers drinking water and they’re threatening to sue the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as well.

WMNF News interviewed Jaclyn Lopez, Florida director of the Center for Biological Diversity, one of the four groups who filed the intent to sue on Tuesday.

“The Army Corps of Engineers has recently approved the phosphate mining development of about 50,000 acres of central Florida and this is predominately in Hardee, Manatee County areas and a little bit in DeSoto County. Most recently, they approved 7,500 acres of mining to start eminently, any moment now, in Hardee County.

Mosaic phosphate mining

Phosphate mining in Florida. By Jaclyn Lopez (used with permission).

“All this mining is going to be taking place in a region known as Central Florida Phosphate District. It’s an area that has seen tremendous phosphate mining over almost the last century. If you go out to that area, which is just east of Tampa, you’ll see the scars from historic phosphate mining.

“Before 1975, phosphate mines didn’t have to be reclaimed. If you’re ever in an airplane over that region of Florida, you’ll see these, sort of really pretty colored bluish-green bodies of water, like lakes, in these strips. That’s the legacy of strip-mining in Florida for phosphate. Since 1975, the companies have been forced to reclaim the land, which is to put it back to some sort of beneficial use, but, not necessarily to restore it.

“Our concern with this 50,000 acres of additional mining is first, it leaves a huge footprint on Florida. You’re removing 50,000 acres of habitat for imperiled species like, the eastern indigo snake and the crested caracara. Also, you’re adding to our existing phosphogypsum problem.

for complete article http://www.wmnf.org/environmentalists-sue-corps-florida-phosphate-mining/